More great reads

I know many of my readers are new to blogging, so I thought I would share some posts from other bloggers taking part in the #52ancestors. Their posts are varied, some not even the traditional type of family history research post. Many vary in their style of writing – some sound like you are talking face to face with the blogger.

This first group of posts are from comments left on Amy Johnson Crow’s Facebook page

  1. Myra is looking for her 105 year old 5x great grandpa
  2. Jan has a very easy reading style and has not mentioned any dates in her post
  3. Marian looked at which grandparents met their grandchildren or vice versa.
  4. Bernie included memories from other family members
  5. Kristin includes lots of photos and memories
  6. Louise makes great use of Trove to fill in the story of her ancestor
  7. Cindi includes an image of life expectancy through the ages
  8. Julie looks at longevity as staying in the same state for a long time
  9. Roberta looks at information leapfrogging through generations
  10. Susan looked at the oldest document she had as part of longevity

This second group of posts are from members of the alumni group for UTAS DipFamHist

  1. Shane has bolded those links that take you to more information on the web
  2. Margaret includes a verse written by an ancestor
  3. Heather (Bleggy) has a way with words and I notice her post has been included in Friday Fossicking
  4. Claire relates to something mentioned in a lecture this week regarding life expectancy
  5. Darlene has divided her post into some interesting sub headings to make it easier to read
  6. Marcia looks at longevity as being a long road in research
  7. Claire is using lots of sources in her post – great that readers can then follow her research links

Readers: Have a read of a couple and remember to leave a comment on their blog. If you want come back here and comment on mine as well.

My dinner party

#52ancestors theme for week 4 is ‘Invite to dinner’  I knew exactly who was coming to my dinner party.

William Chandler and his wife Caroline Chandler nee Bryant and John England and his wife Rebecca England nee Jackson are my great great grandparents on my mother’s paternal line.

I have already written some posts about William and Caroline as well as others on John and Rebecca.

But the reason I want to ask them to dinner is I have a lot of questions to ask them. I have settled for three questions per person.

William:

  • Where exactly were you born and when?
  • Who are your parents?
  • Did you know Caroline and her family before you came to Tasmania in 1855?

Caroline

  • Who was your father and what was your mother’s maiden name?
  • What happened to Charles before you and your mother came out to Tasmania?
  • Did you know William back in England and did he ask for you to emigrate to Tasmania?

John

  • Do you think your life in Tasmania was an improvement over life in Yorkshire?
  • Who were your parents?
  • How did you get to know Rebecca once you were both in Tasmania?

Rebecca

  • I know your father was William but what was your mother’s full name?
  • How is Sarah (Jane) Steele related to you?
  • What relation was Ann Jackson to you?

This would be an interesting dinner party as William and Caroline were free arrivals to Tasmania while John and Rebecca came at their majesty’s request (convicts). I wonder if this would make any difference to the conversation.  William’s family were into gardening while John was an iron moulder. The Chandler family lived in Sandy Bay while the England family were around Molle St, Barrack St and Goulburn St in South Hobart.

William and Caroline’s daughter Julia married John and Rebecca’s son Henry in 1885. I wonder how the two met. Maybe a local church?

Ethnicity on DNA tests

My regular readers know that I am doing a bit on DNA at the moment. My parents, my brother and I have all tested with Ancestry. But I have also uploaded our raw data to FTDNA and most recently MyHeritage. It is interesting to make comparisons between the different results.

Here are my results:

Ancestry DNA

With Family Tree DNA

With My Heritage DNA

It is the same raw data from Ancestry uploaded to the other two sites. They each use different filters or algorithms to get their results. The only one that really surprises me is the 1% Nigerian with My Heritage. Can’t wait to find out what my dad’s results are with his unknown background.

MyHeritage works on 42 ethnic groups around the world. More information found here.

Ancestry looks at 150+ regions of the world.

Readers: If you have tested and uploaded results to other sites, have you found any interesting results? Are there any other sites I should be uploading my data to and why?

Who lived the longest?

Week 3 of the #52ancestors challenge is longevity. For this post I thought I would do a bit of a survey of my direct ancestors to see who lived a long life and then I would research one of those people.

When I look at that list, I am amazed that 12 out of 19 of my direct ancestors have reached the age of 70+ years at death. What was most fascinating though was that one set of my Great great grandparents lived  to their 80s just like my parents.

William CHANDLER grew up in London near Enfield where he worked as a gardener before arriving in Australia  on the sailing ship Fortitude on 15th February 1855. Little is known of his life prior to his arrival in Tasmania. According to the shipping record, he was age 22, single, Church of England and could read and write. He was born in Middlesex and was a gardener. His application to emigrate was from John Leake in Tasmania and it cost him  £22. [1]

The Leake family owned Rosedale (near Campbell Town) in the midlands area of Tasmania where it is assumed William was an estate gardener, along with James AXTON who also arrived on the same ship. I wrote a short fiction story based on their journey.

After his marriage to Caroline BRYANT in October 1859, he was employed at Government House as a gardener. He was often mentioned in newspaper articles in the Mercury winning many prizes in horticultural fetes. I wrote a short story based on one of these articles. The birth of many children often mentions Government House where Caroline’s mother also worked. By 1865, he is mentioned as an ‘old friend’ who has again won the silver medal at the horticultural fete. In 1868, he is mentioned as gardener to His Excellency who was Colonel Gore Browne. [2]

In March 1873, William and Caroline were involved in the inquest of their daughter Sarah aged 2. At this stage they were living at Hestercombe in the area of Granton or Austin’s Ferry. [3]

In October 1882, William prosecuted John Sullivan for stealing 9 fowls off William, but the judge gave him the benefit of the doubt as only a few feathers were shown as evidence.[4]

It seems that young George Chandler (born 1874) did not enjoy attending school (or preferred helping with the gardening), as his father William was summoned in 1887 for a breach of the Schools Act in allowing George to truant. He was fined 5 shillings. [5]

In 1894, at the marriage of his third daughter Caroline, the family was living at Brown’s River Road. [6]

By the time of William and Caroline’s golden wedding anniversary in 1909, they were living in Grosvenor Street, Sandy Bay just around the corner from what is still Chandler’s Nursery.[7]

William lived at 6 Grosvenor Street, Sandy Bay at his death, and is buried at Cornelian Bay Cemetery with his wife.

To read about the Chandler family and the nursery they established, check out this newspaper account. From my research Mona Vale was built in 1867 so probably not the estate where William worked in the midlands.

Sources:

[1] Tasmanian Archives and Heritage  Office (TAHO),  CB7/12/1/3 Bk 5 pp 191-192

[2] 1868 ‘GARDENERS’ AND AMATEURS’ HORTICULTURAL AND AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY.’, The Tasmanian Times (Hobart Town, Tas. : 1867 – 1870), 1 April, p. 3. , viewed 16 Jan 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article232859188

[3] 1873 ‘THE MERCURY.’, The Mercury (Hobart, Tas. : 1860 – 1954), 5 March, p. 2. , viewed 16 Jan 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article8925438

[4] 1882 ‘THE MERCURY.’, The Mercury (Hobart, Tas. : 1860 – 1954), 27 October, p. 2. , viewed 16 Jan 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article9028363

[5] 1887 ‘THE MERCURY.’, The Mercury (Hobart, Tas. : 1860 – 1954), 17 June, p. 2. , viewed 16 Jan 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article9135155

[6] 1894 ‘Family Notices’, The Mercury (Hobart, Tas. : 1860 – 1954), 17 November, p. 4. , viewed 16 Jan 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article9339512

[7] 1909 ‘Family Notices’, The Mercury (Hobart, Tas. : 1860 – 1954), 22 October, p. 1. , viewed 16 Jan 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article9997539

 

A favourite photo – 4 generations

As the family historian, I am forever being given photos to look after. I will need to spend some time scanning and cataloging them over this coming year. So I have lots of favourite photos but very few have four generations in the one image.  I have chosen this one for this week’s prompt for #52 ancestors.

The four people in this photo are my 1st cousin Bronwyn as a babe in arms, her mother Margaret Phillips nee England holding her, then Margaret’s mother Hannah England nee Davey and finally Hannah’s mother Martha Davey nee Colgrave. The picture was taken on 1 April 1951 on Bronwyn’s christening day.

Margaret died in 2017 and I have written about her in this post.  But today I asked my mother (Margaret’s sister) to tell me something about their mother. Here is some info I was told and have also researched over the years.

Early Life

Hannah England nee Davey was born in 1899 at Englishtown near Blessington in Tasmania. She was the 6th born out of 12 children.

Birth certificate Hannah Davey 1899 TAHO RGD 33/1/87 no 598

Englishtown is near the mountains of the Ben Lomond National Park in north-eastern Tasmania and would have been extremely cold during winter. The closest town is Evandale about 22kms away. Life would have been very hard for this large family. Hannah’s father, George, was mentioned in local papers as tendering for works on the roads near their land, but otherwise was a farmer.

1912 ‘EVANDALE.’, Examiner (Launceston, Tas. : 1900 – 1954), 7 March, p. 7. (DAILY), viewed 11 Jan 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article50641551

Hannah’s father died in November 1914, aged just 49 years. He died at the Launceston General Hospital and was interred in the Presbyterian Burial Ground in Evandale. Hannah’s youngest brother, Frederick, was born just one month before her father’s death so I am sure she would have been expected to help look after him when not at school.

Marriage

By 1922, Hannah had moved to the big city of Hobart in southern Tasmania. She was working as a housekeeper to the Lord family in Sandy Bay. This was mentioned in the electoral roll of that year as being on the corner of Grosvenor and Lord Streets. Her future husband, Henry Lewis England, also lived in Grosvenor Street with his parents. This is probably how they met.

Hannah and Henry married on 9 May 1923 at the Methodist Church, Longford. The following article was in the Examiner dated 10 May 1923.

WEDDING BELLS: ENGLAND-DAVEY.
The marriage of Hannah, fourth daughter of Mrs. Davey, of Longford, and the late Mr. George Davey, late of Deddington, and Henry L., only son of Mr. HL. England, and the late Mrs. England, of Sandy Bay, Hobart, took place on Wednesday afternoon at the Longford Methodist Church. Rev. George Arthur, M.A., was the officiating minister. The church was charmingly decorated with white roses and chrysanthemums and autumnal leaves by Misses Gladys Wheeler, and Millie Lee. The bride was given away by her young brother (Mr. Bert Davey) in the unavoidable absence of her elder brother (Mr. W. G. Davey, of Hobart). She wore a pretty frock of white organdie muslin embroidered with beads, and a wreath of orange blossoms and veil, the latter being loaned by her cousin (Mrs. Arthur Sherwood). She carried a shower bouquet of choice white flowers, tied with satin streamers. Her only attendant was her sister (Miss Doris Davey, who wore a frock of white crepe merle trimmed with blue. She carried a posey of white blossoms tied with blue streamers, and wore a gold bangle, the gift of the bridegroom. The bride’s brother (Mr. George Davey) supported the bridegroom as best man. Mrs. Davey (mother of the bride) wore a costume of navy blue serge and a black hat. Miss Gould played the “Wedding March” during the signing of the register, and as the newly-wedded couple left the church, Mrs. Davey entertained the bridal party and immediate relatives at wedding tea at the conclusion of the ceremony. Mr. and Mrs. England left for Launceston, and later on the North East Coast. where the honeymoon will be spent. Mrs. England’s travelling dress was a smart navy blue costume, with cream crochet front and a navy blue and gold hat, with Oriental trimmings. She also wore the bridegroom’s gift – a handsome black fur. Her present to him was a pocket wallet and notebook.
Henry Lewis England and Hannah Davey at marriage May 1923 at Methodist Church, Longford, Tasmania.

Family life

Hannah and Henry had three daughters: Iris Alston 1924 – 1934, Margaret Grace 1928 – 2017 and Phyllis Joan born 1934 and still alive with stories to tell. Iris died one month after the birth of Phyllis, so my mum didn’t get to know her eldest sister. These are some memories my mum had about her mother and family life:

  • Hannah enjoyed crocheting and cooking especially fish.
  • She always helped on committees at Sandy Bay Methodist church.
  • We always went to Long Beach for picnics – caught the double decker tram at the bottom of King Street.
  • We had no car and no phone and only once dad had built the new laundry and bathroom did we get hot running water.
  • Hannah chopped off the top of her thumb helping with the new building.
  • We walked everywhere or caught the trams.
  • Hannah’s mum lived with us for six months of the year and the other half with Hannah’s sister Lizzie who lived in Lenah Valley.
  • We grew a lot of our own food and dad had a great peach tree in the backyard.
  • We used to have lots of visitors and cousins (who were back from the war) who would stay with us – Eileen (mentioned in Margaret’s post) stayed for four years while doing her high school study.
  • On Sunday, dad would cook the roast on the fuel stove while we went to church and Sunday School.
  • For tea every Sunday we would have sponge cake and scones and eat at the dining room table rather than the kitchen table. It was a special event.

A few other pictures of Hannah and the family:

Henry Lewis England died in March 1963 aged 74. Nearly four years to the day Hannah died March 1967 aged 67.

Readers: What memories do you have of your grandmother? Or maybe you have a relative called Hannah?

 

Some great reads here

As some of you know, I have joined the #52ancestors challenge created by Amy Johnson Crow. I have spent the last few days checking out the comments left on her post for blog URLs. I have also followed the hashtag on twitter to get more URLs. On the sidebar of my blog, you will find links under the title #52ancestors. Feel free to visit these blogs and read the posts.

Here are a couple of new bloggers who have only written one or two posts:

  • Dan who might also include stuff about travelling
  • Sumner who wrote about how he started genealogy
  • Lori who wrote a poem for her first post

There were also some bloggers who have finished the Diploma of Family History

I noticed Hilary used a great tool embedded on her blog – I hope she will answer my question I left in her comments.

Readers: Did you find a blogger on the list you might like to follow? Are there any bloggers reading my blog doing the challenge that I haven’t listed on my links?

How did I get started?

The theme for Week 1 in the #52ancestors challenge is “Start”

I can’t remember how old I was when I first got interested in family history and mine in particular. We are a very close knit family – my parents and a younger brother.

Mum’s parents were still alive while I was a child but had died by the time I was 10. I can remember visiting them at their house and having meals there. The main thing I remember is their toilet was outside. Pa England had lots of birds and loved growing fruit trees while Nanna England kept the house tidy and it was always warm and welcoming.

The photo shows my mum, her sister Margaret and her parents Henry and Hannah England. Probably taken in the early 1950s.

Dad’s parents were different. His mum was still alive until the 1980s but his father had left the family when dad was 2 years old. His mum married again, just before I was born, to a Polish repatriated soldier who came here to work on the Hydro dams. For most of his life, though, dad lived with his foster family – the Avery family.

These two photos show dad’s mum and stepfather and his foster mother with her dog Monty.

At high school in the 1960s, as part of the social sciences subject, we had to create a family tree. If I were to look at that same tree now after 40+ years of researching, there would be many errors especially on dad’s side since I have started delving into his DNA.

Readers: How did you get started with your family history research?

DNA and Gedmatch

Following on from my last post, I have raw DNA data from Ancestry stored in a file on my computer and I have now uploaded it to Gedmatch.

Why did I do that?

Gedmatch has a lot more tools for manipulating the data gathered from your DNA. Most of the tools are free but you can also pay a small amount monthly to use some more precise tools.

Once you have registered and uploaded to Gedmatch, take note of your number. If you have tested with Ancestry, your number will start with A. Here are the Gedmatch numbers of the kits I run. Hopefully I might match some of yours.

  • Sue A702006
  • Mum (Phyl) A141289
  • Dad (Bob) A380974
  • Ruby (cousin) A984734
  • Dorothy (hoped was cousin but not) A400283
  • Brother (Phil) A076075
  • Kevin (half uncle) A215065

Tools I have used

The first tool I used was the One-to-many. From this I could see all the people who matched some part of my DNA. It told me about how many generations we were apart and gave me an email address to contact those that were close. It also told me how many cM of DNA I shared and what the largest segment was. The bigger the numbers, the closer the person is in your tree as you can see from my example.

The first five matches are those relatives I asked to test but notice Dorothy is not there from my list. If she was going to be a match, she would have been similar to Ruby at about 3 generations back. Both Ruby and Dorothy are descendants from William Smith (my whaling captain from Samoa) and they match each other. My dad matches Ruby but not Dorothy.

I mainly use the data from the autosomal columns but here is a great post about how X-DNA can help you narrow down which branch of your tree the match might come from. I will need to do this to check the few X-DNA matches I have.

So I now have a list of my autosomal matches. What do I do now?

If I click on the hyperlinked letter A for Lachy’s results (see previous image), it takes me to the one-to-one tool. I don’t make any changes on this form and this is what I then find out about the chromosomes we share.

Lachy and I share DNA on 4 different chromosomes. On one chromosome we share in two different places. The largest segment is 29.8cM and the total is 77.4cM. How can this help me work out the relationship?

I then head to this relationship chart which was updated in August 2017. I actually have this printed and saved so I can refer to it easily. Here it is as a jpeg for printing.

From the chart I can see that Lachy with a total of 77.4cM will fit in the 2C2r area for averages but he could also be closer if you look at the range.

Is Lachy on mum or dad’s side of the family? First take note of Lachy’s gedmatch number. A197294 this means I might be able to find a tree on Ancestry to help me with the match.

To check which side of my tree he is on, I am now going to compare his kit with mum’s kit using another tool. People who match one or both kits. If there are people matching both, then he is on mum’s side of the tree, otherwise he will be on dad’s side.

Wow! I have a huge list of people who match both mum and Lachy.

How am I going to start organizing all this information to make it useful to me? The best bits to use are the actual chromosome numbers and the start and end of the segments of the chromosome locations. I decided to use a spreadsheet where I just copied all mum’s one to many test results – I then added extra columns to include chromosome numbers, start/end locations and SNPs. This is now starting to look workable.

Readers: Which tools on Gedmatch have you found useful and why?

Progressing with DNA

I have been trying to connect all my DNA matches from Ancestry where I tested the DNA of my mum, dad, brother, half uncle, 2nd cousin, possible 2nd cousin and some cousins once removed.

It is easy to work out the close relatives who I have asked to test but once I get to 4th cousins and further back, it is difficult to find out which branch of mum or dad’s tree they come from. What I need to be able to do is find the individual segments of chromosomes that match more than one person and then I might be able to find the precise branch and ancestor the match belongs to.

From this you can see I have a total of 124 4th cousins or closer who have tested with Ancestry.

Of those 124, I have worked out where 24 of them are placed on my tree (using my database on my computer).

Of those 24 matches, 12 of them have me linked on their trees on Ancestry. To be a shared ancestor hint, both people need to be on both matches trees on Ancestry.

But how can I work out where those other 100 cousins are located in my tree? Many of them don’t have trees on Ancestry or they have a very small one but only for living people so it shows as private when I look at their tree.  A few have private trees so you need to ask permission to be able to see their tree.

One of the disadvantages of Ancestry DNA matches is they only show how many cM (centiMorgans) over how many segments you share with your matches. To be able to match certain segment areas, I need more specific information than Ancestry gives me.

This is where the site called Gedmatch comes in. Once you have uploaded your raw data, it allows you to make one-to-many comparisons with others who have also uploaded their data. This could be people who have tested with other companies like Family Tree DNA or 23 and me or My Heritage.

My next post will be about using Gedmatch and how it helps you narrow down your matches to particular common chromosomes segments.

Readers: Have you tested with Ancestry? How is your research going there and how many shared ancestor hints have you worked out so far?

My Aunty Marg

This post is a combination of the eulogy at the funeral of my aunty Marg, my mother’s remembrances (Marg’s sister) and also my talks with aunty Marg.

Margaret Grace Phillips nee England

1928 – 2017

Margaret was born early in April 1928, the second daughter of Hannah and Henry England of Sandy Bay. Her older sister Iris died at the age of 9 when her younger sister Phyllis was only 3 weeks old.

Margaret and her older sister, Iris

Margaret and Iris (above), Margaret and Phyllis (below)

Margaret looks after her younger sister, Phyllis

Margaret was educated at Albuera Street Primary School and Ogilvie High School. This was not an enjoyable experience for her.

Her first job was for pocket money where she washed out pots for flowers at Chandler’s Nursery. Margaret’s grandmother was a Chandler and the nursery was over the back fence of their house in Sandy Bay.

Margaret joined the Brownies and Guides. She loved being outdoors especially going fishing with her Dad, Harry, down near Sandy Bay beach. Marg, though, did not like the water and this carried on throughout her whole life.

Margaret and Phyllis fishing with their dad, Henry

She was always very pleased when her cousin Eileen Davey came and lived with them as she now had someone her age to go to socials and dances with. Margaret was a member of both the junior and senior church choirs at Princess Street Methodist Church.

After leaving school, Marg’s first big job was at Tattersalls and then at the University of Tasmania where she worked in the Refectory from 1966 until 1989. Marg still kept in contact with her friends from Uni, attending monthly lunches at various pubs around Hobart.

Marg married Norm (Ken) Phillips from Sorell in 1949 and in 1950 they built a home in Lenah Valley. Whilst living here, their two children Bronwyn and Leigh were born. But unfortunately the floods of 1954 washed away their outer sheds.

They did rebuild, but Norm’s health had suffered a shock, so they moved to a home in Duke Street, Sandy Bay.

In 1965 Margaret and her family travelled with Phyllis and her husband Bob, and children Suzanne and Philip. They drove through the eastern states of Australia as far north as Cairns, then across through outback Queensland and up to Darwin, down the centre to Alice Springs, Adelaide and back home to Tasmania. This was a trip of 4 months in a caravan towed by the trusty old FC Holden while Phyllis’s family were in a Kombi van and tent.

Margaret did volunteer work with several groups. She was a keen knitter, making rugs, scarves and jumpers for various organizations.

Margaret and Max

She stayed in Sandy Bay until the death of Norm in 1968 when she sold up and bought a unit in Davey Street, where she was very happy . After many years, she moved to Max Jones’s house in South Hobart when they became partners. They later bought a house together in West Moonah where they spent many happy years until Max’s death in 2009.

Marg’s daughter Bronwyn passed away suddenly in 2013.

Marg continued to live in West Moonah, however, due to an increase in health problems, it was decided she would move to a nursing home. After a period of respite, she moved into Queen Victoria Home at Lindisfarne for a period of 7 months prior to her passing. Although she would not admit it fully, she was very happy there and enjoyed not only the friends and company that she had, but also all the activities that were arranged.

Margaret’s much loved family included:

Bronwyn, Margaret and Leigh

2 children – Bronwyn and Leigh

A younger version of Kelli, Kaide and Shannon

5 grandchildren – Kelli, Shannon, Kaide, Chantel and Shawn

Four of the great grandchildren

9 great grandchildren – Jaxsen, Taylia, Kyah, Blake, Manon, Joseph, Hugo, Nate and Luke.

 

As part of my Oral History unit, I recorded aunty Marg talking about her father, Harry.

She also spoke about her mother Hannah, war and holidays.

Relatives:
If any of you have photos of Aunty Marg with the kids or just being herself that I could add to a slideshow and put on the blog, could you please send me a copy?

Readers:

What is a great memory you have with my Aunty Marg? If you didn’t know my Aunty Marg, what is a great memory you have with an aunty?