Story 5 – Murder at the lodging house

“Murder!” One of my children knocked frantically on our bedroom door. “Ma, someone’s being murdered in the back room.”

Dashing out of bed in my nightgown, I lit a candle and moved quickly down the hallway following the child.  At the doorway to the back room, I called out nervously, “What’s the matter?”

Someone inside the room replied. “Get a light missus, one of the men is being murdered.”

On entering the room, I saw a man, later identified as Richard Furlong, kneeling at his bed and stooping over it, holding his hands to his stomach. He had been stabbed but he was not yet dead. The woman he called his wife was sitting up in bed. This couple and another man had arrived at the lodging house about three hours earlier. All three were rather drunk when they arrived but they stayed up, sitting in the kitchen. About 9.30pm the man and his wife went to bed.

The other three beds in the back room were also occupied but I only knew the name of the woman Eliza Kelly or Higgins. She was now standing in the kitchen, screaming. Richard’s mate, dashed out the front door and ran to get the doctor.

I went to check the other bedroom where six more men were sleeping but one bed was empty. Where was that man? Had he committed the murder and then run away?

I remembered hearing Richard’s wife talking to the absent man earlier that evening. “Hello, what fetched you here?” He replied, “I only came here today.”

Source:  

1861 ‘THE LATE STABBING CASE AT EVANDALE.’, Launceston Examiner (Tas. : 1842 – 1899), 23 February, p. 4. (MORNING.), viewed 17 Jan 2017, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article38757954
Background: The woman Isabella Colgrave nee Watkins is my great great great grandmother.

Men who influenced Isabella

There were four men who I believe had an influence on the life of Isabella Watkins.

The first is her father of whom I know nothing other than his daughter Isabella decided she needed to steal clothing to survive in Victorian London. This thieving led to the next man of influence.

Mr. Baron Parke (Photo by Liszt Collection/Heritage Images/Getty Images)
Mr. Baron Parke (Photo by Liszt Collection/Heritage Images/Getty Images)

This is the judge at her trial, Baron Parke, who decided transportation for seven years was a suitable punishment for a persistent shoplifter or thief.

James Parke was a well respected judge especially working in the Court of Exchequer and was mentioned in a Harvard Law Review in 1897:

“one of the greatest of English judges; had he comprehended the principles of equity as fully as he did the principles of the common law, he might fairly be called the greatest. His mental power, his ability to grasp difficult points, to disentangle complicated facts, and to state the law clearly, have seldom been surpassed. No judgments delivered during this period are of greater service to the student of law than his”.[1]

He was so influential in the legal world, a rule of law was named after him.[2]

Would the sentence and punishment he gave Isabella be a positive influence in her life and cause a change in her behaviour?

Now the third man of influence, her master Mr Legge from Cullenswood near Fingal in Van Diemen’s Land, enters her life. Robert Vincent Legge arrived in Van Diemen’s Land in 1827 with his brother and five sisters.[3] He was granted 1200 acres near St Mary’s. He called the property Cullenswood after a property in Ireland. He returns to Ireland and marries in 1839. Bringing his wife back to Van Diemen’s Land, he now needs servants to help run the property and look after his house and his growing family.

Isabella is still behaving badly. But she only committed one offence while under sentence. The local magistrate decided to send her to the Launceston Female House of Correction or factory. She was sentenced to one month’s hard labour which probably meant time at the washtub. Maybe it was this final punishment that helped Isabella mend her ways.

The third man with influence would be her husband. Francis Colegrave arrived in Van Dieman’s Land on theCircassian 16 February 1833, having been tried at Huntingdon Lent Assizes 7 March 1832 on two indictments: one of stealing chests of tea valued 3 pound and  the other of stealing wearing apparel.  He was found guilty and sentenced to fourteen years transportation. He received a Ticket of Leave in March 1839 and a conditional pardon 28 October 1841.[4] This meant he was a free man at the time his wife-to-be applied for permission to marry him. Francis had only two offences while under sentence and was either reprimanded or admonished.

I feel Francis was the steadying influence in Isabella’s life but if it were not for her father, Baron Parke and Robert Legge and their reactions to her behaviour, she would not have arrived in Van Diemen’s Land to eventually become my great great great grandmother.

References

[1] Wikipedia contributors, “James Parke, 1st Baron Wensleydale,” Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia, https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=James_Parke,_1st_Baron_Wensleydale&oldid=718145459 viewed 11 June 2016

[2] http://definitions.uslegal.com/b/baron-parkes-rule/

[3] http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~becher/legge_family_of_rodeen.htm

[4] TAHO, CON 31/1/7 p178, Conduct record Francis Colegrave

Readers: Who do you think was the most influential person in changing the behaviour of your convict?

Following Isabella’s paper trail

Reproduced with the permission of the National Library of Scotland, http://maps.nls.uk/view/103313045
Reproduced with the permission of the National Library of Scotland, http://maps.nls.uk/view/103313045

It was at St Mary Newington in Surrey on Monday 7 December in 4th year of Queen Victoria (1840) when Isabella Watkins was convicted of a felony using the name Mary Johnson. This record was found while I was visiting the National Archives at Kew in 1990. The reference was HO 27/65.   But using England and Wales Criminal register 1791-1892, I could find no reference to her name being Isabella Watkins. Instead it was Mary Johnson (16) who was given three months imprisonment for larceny on this date.[1]

A little over three months later, Isabella Watkins of the parish of St Mary Lambeth was charged on 15 March 1841 of stealing two shawls valued one pound from Isaac Atkinson and Thomas Coates who owned a shop on Westminster Bridge Road.[2] This road in Surrey has Newington on one side and Lambeth on the other.

Two weeks later, she was tried at the Surrey Assizes and sentenced to seven years transportation.  According to her conduct record, she had been convicted before, serving three months for stealing a dress, 21 days for stealing stockings and two months for stealing dress material called Mousseline de Laine.  Isabella stated ‘I lived the last two years by thieving.’ [3]  No more references to Isabella can be found in the criminal register for stealing stockings and dress material.

Extract from The Morning Post (London, England), Sunday, 31 March 1841 p 7
Extract from The Morning Post (London, England), Sunday, 31 March 1841 p 7

The newspaper report of her trial mentions she was a respectable looking young woman; maybe this was why she stole clothing, especially fancy dress material. But she was also a vocal individual.  Baron Parke, the judge at her trial, was known to be a very straight speaking man and I noticed in other trials he presided over that repeat offenders were usually transported. He was looking after the tradespeople who had to be protected from others like Isabella.[4]

Extract from The Lancaster Gazette and General Advertiser, for Lancashire, Westmorland, &c. (Lancaster, England), Saturday, 24 March 1832; p1 issue 1606
Extract from The Lancaster Gazette and General Advertiser, for Lancashire, Westmorland, &c. (Lancaster, England), Saturday, 24 March 1832; p1 issue 1606

Apparently Isabella and her soon to be husband Francis Colgrave were like minded in the way they treated the judge when he pronounced sentence upon them at court.[5]

The convict transport Garland Grove had docked at the London Customs House at Woolwich in early April.[6] Where had Isabella been held between her trial date and 12 April? The gaol report on her conduct record mentions she was bad but having searched records for many gaols in the area of London and Surrey, nothing has been found telling us where she was incarcerated. Isabella is also missing on the census taken on 6 June 1841; I now realise she would have been travelling down the Thames on the evening it was taken.

It was on 5 June 1841 when Isabella departed London, heading first to Gravesend then to the town of Deal near the area of the North Sea known as The Downs.[7] This is where many ships would anchor until fair weather allowed them to sail out into the English Channel.

The barque Garland Grove, which was built in 1820, arrived in Hobart Town, Van Diemen’s Land on 10 October 1841. The master for this trip was William Forward and the surgeon superintendent was Robert Dobie. The trip took 109 days.[8]  Isabella must have had an uneventful voyage as she was not mentioned in the surgeon superintendent’s medical journal as having been in sick bay at all. But the surgeon’s report on her conduct record mentions she was bad. This must relate to her behaviour on board rather than her health. Despatches and newspapers dated up to 24 June were sent onboard from England; many related to the Corn Laws being discussed in Parliament at that time.[9]

Upon arrival in Van Diemen’s Land, Isabella was probably one of the 80 convicts from the Garland Grove who were sent to Launceston as less than 4 months later she had committed her one and only offence noted on her conduct record below.

 

TAHO, CON 40/1/10, p228, Conduct record Isabella Watkins
TAHO, CON 40/1/10, p228, Conduct record Isabella Watkins

It was on 10 February 1842 when she was given one month hard labour at the Launceston House of Correction or Female Factory.  This was for disobedience of orders and insolence while working for Mr Legge (most probably Robert Vincent Legge at Cullenswood near Fingal in north eastern Tasmania.)  A decision was made by the Lieutenant Governor on 18 February 1842.  The magistrate was probably William Franks who was based at Fingal and it was requested that Isabella be returned to Government service after she had finished her time in the factory.[10]

The next piece of paper we find on her trail is that of her permission to marry.[11] Convicts in Van Diemen’s Land had to apply to the Convict Department for permission to marry if they had not finished their sentence.

Permission to marry for Isabella Watkins, CON 52/1/2, p027 TAHO

Permission to marry for Isabella Watkins, CON 52/1/2, p027 TAHO

Like many female convicts at that time, they were encouraged to marry about a year after arriving in VDL and so it was on 14 November 1842 that Isabella married Francis Coldgrave (Colgrave) from Evandale.  They were married at the newly built St Thomas Anglican Church at Avoca.[12]

Marriage certificate for Isabella Watkins, RGD 37/1/3 No 85/1842, District of Avoca, TAHO

Marriage certificate for Isabella Watkins, RGD 37/1/3 No 85/1842, District of Avoca, TAHO

 

St Thomas Anglican Church, Avoca taken by Sue Wyatt in May 2016

St Thomas Anglican Church, Avoca taken by Sue Wyatt in May 2016

Over the next few years, the only times Isabella was mentioned in the newspapers was when gaining her ticket of leave in 1845, being recommended for her conditional pardon in 1846 and receiving that pardon in 1847.[13]

In her 48 years of marriage to Francis, they raised a family of nine children (two daughters and seven sons). They remained in the district of Evandale where at one stage they ran a boarding house and mention was made in the local paper of a murder on the night of 17 February 1861.[14]

They must have had a very loving and close relationship as Francis died on 24 October 1890 aged 85 and just over a week later Isabella died on 3 November aged 67.[15]

But the questions still are:

Is she Isabella Watkins or Mary Johnson?  Is she from Yorkshire or Surrey?

Maybe we will never know the answers but Isabella Watkins, either convict or free woman, raised a fine family, with hundreds of descendants still living in Tasmania today especially around Evandale.

References

[1] England and Wales Criminal register 1791-1892: Class: HO 27; Piece: 62; Page: 243 , 1840 Mary Johnson viewed 17 May 2016

[2] The National Archives, ASSI 94/2329, Isabella Watkins, viewed June 1990

[3] TAHO, CON 40/1/10, p228, Conduct record Isabella Watkins

[4] British Newspapers 1600-1900, The Morning Post (London, England), Sunday, 31 March 1841, p 7 issue 21905, viewed 18 May 2016

[5] British Newspapers 1600-1900, The Lancaster Gazette and General Advertiser, for Lancashire, Westmorland, &c. (Lancaster, England), Saturday, 24 March 1832, p 1 issue 1606, viewed 18 May 2016

[6] British Newspapers 1600-1900, The Morning Post, Tuesday 13 April 1841, Issue 21916, viewed 18 May 2016

[7] British Newspapers 1600-1900, The Morning Chronicle, Saturday 5 June 1841, Issue 22317; The Morning Chronicle, Saturday 19 June 1841, Issue 22329; The Standard, Thursday 24 June 1841, Issue 5309,  all viewed 18 May 2016

[8] http://www.hawkesbury.net.au/claimaconvict/shipDetails.php?shipId=764

[9] ‘THE COURIER.’, The Courier (Hobart, Tas. : 1840 – 1859), 15 October 1841, p 2., viewed 18 May 2016, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2955433

[10] TAHO, CON 40/1/10, p228, Conduct record Isabella Watkins

[11] TAHO, CON 52/1/2, p027, Permission to marry Isabella Watkins, Francis Colegrave

[12] TAHO, RGD 37/1/3 No 85, District of Avoca 1842, Marriage certificate Isabella Watkins, Francis Coldgrave

[13]  ‘THE GAZETTE.’, Colonial Times (Hobart, Tas. : 1828 – 1857), 28 September 1847, p. 4. , viewed 01 Jun 2016, http:/nla.gov.au/nla.news-article8761424;

[14]  ‘SUPREME COURT.’, Launceston Examiner (Tas. : 1842 – 1899), 4 May 1861, p. 3. (MORNING.), viewed 04 Jun 2016, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article38759339

[15] TAHO, RGD35/1/59 no 681 District of Evandale 1890, Death certificate Francis Colgrave; TAHO, RGD35/1/59 no 683 District of Evandale 1890, Death certificate Isabel Colgrave

Readers: What was a great website you used that had interesting information relating to your convict ancestor?

PS I still need to insert the images correctly with captions but this is how they copy and pasted across direct from Our Family Past.

Letter N challenge

Today is ANZAC Day here in Australia and New Zealand so I thought I could combine three things in one post.

Wreaths in Hall of ValourThe letter N is for

New Course

I have enrolled as a student in a new course HAA007 (part of the Diploma of Family History) at the University of Tasmania titled “Convict Ancestors” run by Hamish Maxwell-Stewart and his team. I have previously been involved with “Founders and Survivors” also organized with Hamish and a different team. They were looking at descendants of convicts and how their improvements in health evolved over time eg height , weight of sons, grandsons  etc

So this leads to the second part of this post which is looking at the descendants of my convicts who may have served in WWI. I will need to carefully look at my database and check them out – so far I know of three in the COLGRAVE side of the tree.

Finally to the third thing in this post is a link I found on another facebook group which is about a special blog post for Military Monday and relating to ANZAC Day. For those searching for information on their soldiers in WWI, check out the great links in that blog post.

So now let’s start the true part of the post.  My convicts and their descendants who served in WWI:

Francis COL(E)GRAVE:

Great grandson – Private Roy Graham COLGRAVE who I have researched carefully and already written a post about his life in WWI. His records are in the National Archives of Australia SERN 5996 – 56 pages

Grandson –  William COLGRAVE – SERN 834 – 66 pages

Grandson –  Walter COLGRAVE – SERN Depot – 20 pages

Great grandson –  Walter William COLGRAVE – SERN T9050 – 15 pages

Great grandson –  Tasman Allan COLGRAVE – SERN 1060 – 33 pages

Great grandson – Angus Colin COLGRAVE – no digitised record yet

William TEDMAN

Grandson – Edward James TEDMAN – SERN 6096 – 37 pages

John ENGLAND

Grandson? – Edward ENGLAND – is this Vivian Edward ENGLAND? – SERN 2177 – 16 pages

I haven’t researched the BOYD side of the tree enough to know the grandsons and great grandsons who might be mentioned in the Discovering ANZACs website.

Readers: Please leave a comment about my post or something beginning with N that relates to your family history or your research.

 letter N

Letter D challenge

1558 Ainscough Origins

Boobelle via Compfight

Direct Line or Descendants

When you began your family history research, what did you start with? Did you begin with yourself and go back one generation at a time following your direct line only? Or did you also look at the descendants of those direct lines?

I know when I began I started just with names, dates and places and going back as far as I could – in fact I got back to 1604 with one line in Bedfordshire, England. I made connections with other researchers by using the Rootsweb emailing lists and also contacting others mentioned in the IGI (International Genealogical Index) and the IGRD (International Genealogical Research Directory). I exchanged information through RAOGK (Random Acts of Genealogical Kindness) where I would do some research in Tasmania for a person in another county of England and they would do research for me in their county.

But nowadays technology has really allowed me to do a lot more research with original records online. Less having to visit an actual archives, at least for the basics of BDM records. But it is fantastic to see so many Historical Societies having a presence online. This now allows me to connect with locals in the areas where my ancestors lived. My family history blog has also created connections with family members I knew nothing about.

By researching the descendants I have found out more about their life as a family and the community they lived in. Trove and other newspaper reports have put flesh on the bones of my family rather than just a list of names, dates and places.

Surnames in my direct line include:

  • WYATT – unknown where born
  • ENGLAND – Rotherham, York, ENG
  • SMITH – Recherche Bay, Tasmania AUS but originally Samoan and given surname Smith
  • DAVEY – Devon, ENG – free settler and down to 7 possible people
  • TEDMAN – London, ENG – waterman
  • CHANDLER – London, ENG – gardeners in Tasmania and at Government House in the 1860’s
  • COLGRAVE –  Thurleigh, Bedfordshire, ENG – back to 1604
  • SOMMERS – Portland, Tasmania, AUS
  • JACKSON – Donegal, Ireland
  • DIXON – London, ENG
  • BOYD – Maker, Cornwall, ENG
  • WATKINS – Hull, Yorkshire, ENG
  • HEARN – Edgeware, London, ENG
  • BRYANT – Rotherhithe, London, ENG
  • BULL – London, ENG
  • SWAIN – Maidstone, Kent, ENG

Readers: Please leave a comment about my post or something beginning with D that relates to your family history or your research.

letter D

Private Roy Graham COLGRAVE

Roy Graham Colgrave was born 12 April 1896 at Pipers River in the area known as the East Tamar, Tasmania, Australia. His parents were Samuel and Jane Colgrave (nee Duncanson). He was the eldest of 7 children, 4 boys and 3 girls. Keith, his youngest brother was only 14 months old when Roy enlisted for World War 1.

Roy was 5 feet 6.25 inches tall and weighed 136 pounds. He had a fair complexion, blue eyes and fair hair. He was a Methodist. One way to identify Roy was by the mole on his left shoulder.

On the 27 March 1916 he was considered fit for service but there may have been something wrong with his teeth as this is mentioned on the form.

When Roy enlisted on 1 May 1916 he was just 20 years old and was a labourer. He had never been in the military before but mentioned on his attestation papers is the following as an extra added to question 11.

Attestation paper Roy  Graham Colgrave

Does this mean he was a regular in the 92nd Infantry?

On 7 August 1916, he is appointed to 19th reinforcements in the 12th Battalion.

Regimental number 5996, departed Hobart on 8 August 1916 on the OC Troopship “Ballarat” and disembarked over a month later at Plymouth, England on 30 September 1916.

HMAT A70 Ballarat

Image Source: Courtesy State Library of Victoria and Flotilla Australia  Thanks John.

On 19 November 1916 he proceeded to France via Folkestone on the SS Onward. He had been with 3rd Training Battalion prior to this departure. The 19th reinforcements then marched to 1st Australian Division Base Depot at Etaples, France. This was the largest of the training camps in France and had British, Canadian and Australian soldiers training there. It also had many hospitals and cemeteries at Etaples.

Below is an image of the 18th Battalion practicing in the ‘Bull Ring‘ at Etaples.

Image copyright: Copyright expired – public domain

Trying to read his service record and casualty record, the dates are quite confusing as to when he was taken on strength or struck off strength. In other words when he moved from reinforcements to battalion to hospital and back to battalion.

On 5 December he was taken on strength with the 12th Battalion AIF but was in hospital sick on the 11th December. In this period, 94 of the reinforcements under the leadership of Captain LE Burt were on duty and could have been employed in carrying equipment to the front lines and in improving the lines of communication. Trenches were also being improved and A frames and hurdles were taken to the front line.

According to the war diaries for the 12th Battalion, on December 11, a fatigue party of 13 men were taking hot tea to the front lines but lost direction and ended up at a German trench. They immediately withdrew but were fired upon. One soldier killed, two wounded, two missing and one arrived back 2 nights later. The rest got back safely to their lines. On the 12 December they were relieved by the 9th Battalion and 18 reinforcements were reported as casualties, 1 killed and 6 wounded. Here is a link to the trenches map of the area they were in.

On 14 December Roy  was admitted to the 25 Stationary Hospital at Rouen with mumps. He was then moved to 5th Field Ambulance and the 39th Casualty and Clearing Station still at Rouen. By 3 January 1917 back at the Stationary Hospital and then transferred to the No 2 Convalescent Depot. Back to base at Etaples on 6 January.

Rejoined his unit with the 12 Battalion on 17 January and headed into camp at Bresle where a heavy snow had fallen the previous night. On 24 January headed to Fricourt A Camp for more training. As they were going through Albert, there was a casualty from a bomb dropped by a hostile plane. On 28 January they moved on to Bazentin le Petit making improvements to camp lines, latrines and doing more training.

According to the syllabus of training, it included physical training, rifle exercises, bayonet fighting and route marches. Often a Commanding Officer would arrive for  company or battalion in attack drills. Here is two weeks training. If a member of the intelligence platoon, this was your typical training. If in the Lewis Machine Gun Reserves, your training looked like this. Bombers trained differently including throwing grenades.

Here is a set of operation orders from 21 January 1917, including a map of the trench area involved. Note the typist always get K and L mixed up.

On February 11, the 12th Battalion relieved the 4th Battalion at Eaucourt l’Abbaye sector. The thaw then set in rapidly and men were working in muddy conditions improving Pioneer Alley and Pioneer Support. The enemy began firing ‘Pineapple bombs’ and the front line had to be moved out into No Mans Land by 50 yards to avoid the fire. This caused the death of one officer and 4 other ranks O/R and the wounding of one officer and 6 O/Rs.

On 24 February the enemy began retiring from their front line, so the ANZAC Battalions moved in and cleared up trenches and villages. The main opposition was a strong post on the junction of Misty Way and Warlencourt Road. Three of the enemy were killed and 8 more shot by Lewis Machine Gun fire while retreating.

On 1 March 1917, the battalion moved to Dernancourt for more training sessions. On 23 March, 39 officers and 958 O/R moved to Baizieux, where they adopted summer time on the 24th. Report for the month from Lt Col H Elliott:

The whole of the month has been spent in training: the first half in attacking under barrage fire and the second half in open warfare and tactical schemes. The results obtained have been very satisfactory and most encouraging.

The health of the battalion has been good and their morale excellent.

The reinforcements obtained have been of good physique, intelligent and well trained.

On 1 April, the divisional commander attended the church parade at Baizieux. On 4 April at 0900 they left Baizieux and marched to Montauban then onto Fremicourt the next day. They relieved the 9th Battalion in the lines and on Sunday 8 April they attacked and bombed a windmill at Boursies. The Germans open fired with machine guns but the Aussies advanced, and the Bosche retreated, two of them had been bayonetted then six surrendered but threw a percussion bomb so were immediately killed. For the remainder of that day under cover of a blizzard, the Germans tried to gain back the mill but were driven off. There was an intense bombardment of pineapple trench mortar bombs and smoke bombs but by Wednesday evening the remainder of 12th Battalion were back at Morchies after having taken two machine guns and many trenches from the enemies. Here is a quick report of the casualties and end of the fight.

On 14/15 April, the 12th Battalion relieved 9th Battalion at Lagnicourt. The companies were increasing and consolidating extra picquets and posts; enemy guns were silent and flares absent, when at 0400 they were attacked by the Germans. D Company were attacked from front, left and rear; A Company forced back by numbers 10 to 1 in the front and sniping from the rear. Begin reading the account of this fighting on this page and continue for many more.

On 15 April 1917, Roy was one of 37 reported as missing in action since the fighting at Lagnicourt.

By 2 June this has been changed to POW (Prisoner of War) captured at Lagnicourt and interned at Limburg in the state of Hesse in western Germany. From what I have read, Limburg was a registration camp. Conditions there were terrible and many died of shellfire, disease or starvation.

Looking at Roy’s Red Cross file at the Australian War Memorial website, he was transferred to Friedrichsfeld on 16 November 1917.

On 18 December 1917, his next of kin Samuel and Jane Colgrave were notified he was now a prisoner of war. Sometime between June 1917 and January 1918, he is moved to the Kriegsgefangenen Lazarett at Fuhlsbuttel in Hamburg, Germany. A Lazarett is a military hospital for POWs.

On 19 January 1918 he dies from tuberculosis and meningitis.   During the last part of his life, he was unconscious. Roy was buried with military honours at Ohlsdorfer Cemetery in Hamburg on 22 January.

By 6 March 1918 the War Office in London had been notified of his death.

On 10 April 1919, Jane Colgrave signed for a package being the effects of Roy sent from Germany via the War Office. It included: post cards, photos, a canvas bag, 8 coinsand a paybook handed to Estates Branch at AIF Headquarters London. It also included a will written by Roy on 5 March 1917 where, upon his death, he gives all his effects and property to his mother.

On 17 April, 1920 a photograph was sent to Sam and Jane of Roy’s grave.

On 16 April, 1921 his father received Roy’s British War Service Medal.

On 28 July, 1921 Samuel signed a receipt for a memorial scroll and King’s message.

On 24 October  1922, Samuel again signed a receipt for a memorial plaque for Roy’s grave.

On March 28, 1923 his Victory Medal was given to his father.

In a letter dated 4 December 1924, Samuel Colgrave was told his son’s body had been exhumed and re-interred at Plot 1, Row C, Grave 4 still in the Hamburg Cemetery section now under the control of the Imperial War Graves Commission.

Readers: All information in this post is found in the service records of Private Roy Graham Colgrave and held at the National Archives of Australia. They can be found at the website Discovering ANZACs which also includes soldiers from New Zealand. I also included some research of particular places mentioned and read the war diaries for the 12th Battalion which can be found in the Australian War Memorial website.

Readers: What do you know about any of your relatives who served in World War 1?

My ANZAC relatives

This post will include the names of all my relatives who served in World War I. As I find their names I will add them to this post.  I will include links to their records from the Discovering ANZACs website put together by the National Archives of Australia.

William COLGRAVE – SERN 834 – 66 pages

Walter COLGRAVE – SERN Depot – 20 pages

Roy Graham COLGRAVE – SERN 5996 – 56 pages

Walter William COLGRAVE – SERN T9050 – 15 pages

Tasman Allan COLGRAVE – SERN 1060 – 33 pages

Family of John and Martha Boyd

1. John BOYD (7 Dec 1814 – 9 Oct 1862) & Martha VICO nee HEARN (1812/1816 – 25 Jan 1880)

| 1. Ann BOYD (1842 – ) & Thomas GIBSON (1832 – )

| | 1. Mary Ann GIBSON (1860 – ) & William HOLMES (1855 – )

| | | 1. William Thomas HOLMES (1878 – 1879)

| | | 2. Julia Ann HOLMES (1880 – )

| | | 3. Charlotte Isabel HOLMES (1882 – )

| | | 4. William Thomas HOLMES (1884 – )

| | | 5. Ethel May HOLMES (1886 – )

| | | 6. Edith May HOLMES (1888 – )

| | | 7. George Henry HOLMES (1890 – )

| | | 8. Albert Ernest HOLMES (1892 – )

| | | 9. Ivey Helen HOLMES (1894 – )

| | | 10. Leslie Leonard HOLMES (1896 – )

| | | 11. Corrie Nergia Violet HOLMES (1898 – )

| | 2. Thomas Henry GIBSON

| | 3. Martha Eliza GIBSON

| | 4. William Robert GIBSON

| | 5. GIBSON

| | 6. Ada May GIBSON

| | 7. Thomas Henry GIBSON

| | 8. Albert John GIBSON

| 2. Susan BOYD (29 May 1844 – 27 Feb 1900) & Francis COLGRAVE (11 Nov 1843 – 26 Jun 1920)

| | 1. Francis John COLGRAVE (25 Feb 1866-31 Dec 1942) & Laura Maud WYNWOOD (21 Mar 1870-8 Apr 1969)

| | | 1. Angus Colin COLGRAVE* (28 Apr 1893 – 9 May 1977) & Doris UPTON (About 1901 – 27 Feb 1931)

| | | 1. Angus Colin COLGRAVE* (28 Apr 1893 – 9 May 1977) & Iris Mary EBERHARD (About 1910 – 23 Dec 1986)

| | | 2. Francis Robert Leonard COLGRAVE (17 May 1903 – 23 Jun 1987) & Irene Agnes YATES (About 1905 – 18 Mar 1978)

| | | 3. Grace Valerie Violet COLGRAVE (4 May 1913 – )

| | 2. Samuel COLGRAVE (13 Aug 1867 – 17 Feb 1955) & Jeanne (Jane) DUNCANSON (27 Feb 1875 – 31 Jul 1945)

| | | 1. Roy Graham COLGRAVE (12 Apr 1896 – 19 Jan 1918)

| | | 2. Doris Ellen COLGRAVE (15 Feb 1899 – 19 Apr 1960) & Tom COCKING

| | | 3. Susan Jane COLGRAVE (26 Jun 1901 – 8 Apr 1927) & John DENMAN

| | | 4. Colin Campbell COLGRAVE (18 Jul 1903-9 Jul 1981) & Marion Margaret DYSON (20 Apr 1908-10 Jun 1988)

| | | 5. Elvie COLGRAVE (16 Jan 1906 – ) & Horace JOHN

| | | 6. Mervyn Samuel COLGRAVE (24 Sep 1910 – 10 Mar 1984) & Etta EADE

| | | 7. Keith James COLGRAVE (6 Mar 1915 – 20 Aug 1992) & Ruth Mavis BULLOCK (Approx 1920 – 4 Oct 1997)

| | 3. Frances Isabella COLGRAVE* (10 Feb 1869 – 21 Mar 1928) & House Servant COLGRAVE??

| | | 1. Tasman Allan COLGRAVE (18 Mar 1893 – 2 Jul 1985) & Harriet Young COLES (12 Mar 1897 – 17 Feb 1980)

| | | 2. Thomas Leslie COLGRAVE (30 Sep 1895 – 2 Oct 1973) & Winifred Emily Jane HARRIS (About 1886 – 25 Aug 1961)

| | 3. Frances Isabella COLGRAVE* (10 Feb 1869 – 21 Mar 1928) & William Edward JONES (1844 – 28 Oct 1912)

| | | 1. Ralph JONES (11 Nov 1901 – 28 Jul 1950) & Vera Annie DAVEY (23 Oct 1901 – 3 Mar 1962)

| | | 2. Louisa Latoska JONES (13 Jun 1903 – 1997) & Gerald SMITH

| | | 3. Edward Stanley (Teddy) JONES (13 Oct 1905 – Sep 1985) & Olive PATTERSON

| | | 4. Emily JONES (5 Dec 1907 – 1 Oct 1991) & Harry WARN ( – 1988)

| | | 5. James Walter JONES (Nov 1911 – 14 Jan 1912)

| | | 6. Florence Isabella (Ena) JONES (1913 – 1965) & Leslie JONES

| | 3. Frances Isabella COLGRAVE* (10 Feb 1869 – 21 Mar 1928) & Cyril Edwin HEAZLEWOOD (8 Apr 1890 – 1954)

| | 4. William F COLGRAVE (23 Dec 1871 – 13 Nov 1905) & Lillian May BROWN (25 May 1881 – )

| | | 1. Olive (Maud) Jessie COLGRAVE (9 Oct 1896 – 1 Nov 1917)

| | | 2. Milly (Monia) Victoria COLGRAVE (21 Jun 1899 – ) & Solomon EADE

| | | 3. Walter William COLGRAVE(STEVENS)* (25 Jun 1901 – 21 Nov 1965) & Esther Maud CHRISTIAN (22 Jul 1902 – 4 Mar 1967)

| | | 3. Walter William COLGRAVE(STEVENS)* (25 Jun 1901 – 21 Nov 1965) & Helen SHEPHERD

| | 5. Martha Jane COLGRAVE (13 Mar 1874 – 18 Aug 1954) & George DAVEY (31 May 1865 – 2 Nov 1914)

| | | 1. Mary Ann DAVEY (13 Jan 1891 – 19 Jul 1946) & Gordon BURFORD (1886 – 18 Apr 1949)

| | | 2. Emily Jane DAVEY (12 Jan 1893 – 29 Apr 1956) & Trevor COX (1883 – 1 May 1962)

| | | 3. John (Jack) DAVEY (28 Sep 1894 – 20 Feb 1931) & Mary HARVEY

| | | 4. William George (James) DAVEY (9 Dec 1895 – 25 Apr 1953) & Nellie Olive POWELL (19 Mar 1896 – 29 Sep 1980)

| | | 5. Elizabeth (Lizzie) DAVEY (19 Apr 1897 – 9 Oct 1979) & James BOXHALL (23 Mar 1895 – 1 Dec 1982)

| | | 6. Hannah DAVEY (10 Nov 1899 – 7 Mar 1967) & Henry Lewis ENGLAND (12 Dec 1888 – 12 Mar 1963)

| | | 7. George DAVEY (18 Jan 1902 – 4 Sep 1972) & Lucy Ellen WICKHAM (27 Feb 1905 – 22 Oct 1981)

| | | 8. Elsie DAVEY (18 Dec 1904 – 16 Oct 1915)

| | | 9. Bertie Leonard DAVEY (25 Apr 1907 – 5 Aug 1940) & Renee Olive PAGE (29 Jun 1908 – 7 Dec 1978)

| | | 10. Leila Jessie DAVEY (28 Apr 1909 – 22 Jun 1917)

| | | 11. Doris Eileen DAVEY (3 Oct 1911 – ) & Dudley JONES

| | | 12. Frederick Trevor DAVEY (2 Oct 1914 – 2 Aug 1984) & Kathleen HUNTINGTON

| | 6. Lillian Ada (Moy) COLGRAVE (27 Jun 1876 – 7 Mar 1957) & Charles DAVEY (19 Feb 1872 – 18 Oct 1914)

| | | 1. Annie May DAVEY (31 Mar 1897 – ) & David James LINDSAY (1893 – 1966)

| | | 2. George Charles DAVEY (6 Jan 1898 – 28 Feb 1965) & Winifred McLEAN (25 Jan 1898 – 23 Oct 1978)

| | | 3. Susan Jane DAVEY (26 Mar 1900 – 29 Sep 1967) & Thornton Richard MURFETT (About 1890 – 5 Aug 1973)

| | | 4. Lilian Daisy DAVEY (6 Apr 1903 – 16 Jul 1989) & Eric Stanley BOYD (11 Aug 1901 – 13 Oct 1971)

| | | 5. Charles William DAVEY (4 Sep 1904 – 29 Mar 1929)

| | | 6. Olive Amy DAVEY (24 Sep 1905 – ) & Albert HILL ( – 1976)

| | | 7. Harry James DAVEY (26 Jan 1908 – ) & Violet E ATKINSON

| | | 8. Daphne Eileen DAVEY (16 Dec 1910 – ) & William Ernest BRETT

| | | 9. Ivy Mary DAVEY (24 Sep 1912 – ) & Arthur Charles SAUNDERS

| | | 10. Vernon Edward DAVEY (14 Dec 1913 – ) & Lorna Florence WALKER

| | 7. Alfred Arthur (John) COLGRAVE (7 Nov 1878-2 May 1959) & Ada Mary COWARD (10 Dec 1876 – 16 Aug 1953)

| | | 1. Elsie COLGRAVE & Arthur SHERWOOD

| | | 2. Hector Arthur COLGRAVE (17 Oct 1902 – ) & Eileen Mary RASMUSSEN

| | | 3. Pearl COLGRAVE & Jack SPICER

| | | 4. Alfred Charles COLGRAVE (Approx 1906 – Jun 1964) & Agnes Jane HILL (Approx 1907 – 1 Sep 1992)

| | | 5. Stanley George COLGRAVE (1908 – 20 Sep 1978) & Mary Florence BREEN (1917 – 16 Aug 1993)

| | | 6. Leonard Frederick COLGRAVE (19 Feb 1910 – 24 Aug 1981) & Doris SMITH

| | | 7. Cecil COLGRAVE ( – Before 1978) & Phyllis

| | | 8. Gladys COLGRAVE* & Ron BISHOP

| | | 8. Gladys COLGRAVE* & CLARK

| | | 9. Ida Ismay COLGRAVE & Frederick V EWART

| | | 10. Vernon Thomas COLGRAVE (6 Apr 1917 – 20 Jul 1999) & Patricia WATKINS

| | | 11. Evelyn Caroline COLGRAVE & William Ray HAY

| | | 12. Daisy Jean COLGRAVE* & George W BREEN

| | | 12. Daisy Jean COLGRAVE* & George HUXLEY

| | 8. Ernest Charles COLGRAVE (30 Dec 1881 – 16 May 1940) & Alice Maria REDBURN (17 Sep 1879 – )

| | 9. Ethel Mary Ann COLGRAVE* (9 Dec 1883 – ) & Mark REDBURN (15 Nov 1867 – 8 Jan 1936)

| | | 1. Ruby REDBURN & Fred GREEN

| | | 2. Donald Mark REDBURN (Approx 1907 – 6 Oct 1984) & Vera Anne Louise SAUNDERS (Approx 1915 – 21 Mar 1993)

| | 9. Ethel Mary Ann COLGRAVE* (9 Dec 1883 – ) & Arthur THOMPSON (19 Apr 1882 – 14 May 1961)

| | 10. Frederick George COLGRAVE (28 Aug 1886 – 3 Feb 1959) & Amy Louisa RIGBY (15 Apr 1893 – 4 Oct 1985)

| | | 1. Rita Jean COLGRAVE (3 Dec 1912 – 16 Feb 1986) & Charles E Marney GRANT

| | | 2. Muriel Phyllis COLGRAVE* (24 Aug 1914 – ) & Maurice Henry THOMAS

| | | 2. Muriel Phyllis COLGRAVE* (24 Aug 1914 – ) & Leonard George APPLEBY

| | | 3. Amy Iris COLGRAVE* (22 Mar 1917 – 23 Aug 1983) & Alfred BRYANT

| | | 3. Amy Iris COLGRAVE* (22 Mar 1917 – 23 Aug 1983) & Jack ARNOL

| | | 4. Eunice Frances COLGRAVE (18 Jan 1919 – 4 Nov 1957) & Percival CREELEY

| | | 5. Frederick George (Jun.) COLGRAVE (30 Mar 1920 – 10 Jul 1954) & Myra ADAMS

| | | 6. Nellie Mavis COLGRAVE (21 Sep 1922 – ) & George LOWE

| | | 7. Rex COLGRAVE (27 Jan 1925 – ) & Margaret HAYWOOD

| | | 8. William Roy COLGRAVE (27 Jan 1928 – 4 Oct 1951)

| | | 9. Henry Douglas COLGRAVE (16 Nov 1931 – )

| | | 10. Margaret Dawn COLGRAVE & Harold JUDKINS

| | | 11. Trevor Maxwell COLGRAVE (31 Oct 1931 – 28 Aug 1980) & Joan May WEBBER (Approx 1938 – 15 May 1990)

| | | 12. Ronald George COLGRAVE (12 Aug 1935 – 12 Nov 1999) & June HYDE (Killworth?)

| 3. Catherine (Kate) BOYD (1846 – ) & Frederick Henry WEEKES (1836 – )

| | 1. Ada Jane WEEKES (1871 – )

| 4. Robert John BOYD (1 Jul 1848 – 26 Jan 1918) & Mary Ann BATES (About 1842 – 29 Nov 1908)

| | 1. Robert BOYD (1870 – )

| | 2. Sarah Ann BOYD (1874 – )

| | 3. Harriet BOYD (1877 – )

| | 4. Robert BOYD (1879 – 31 Jul 1879)

| | 5. Frederick John BOYD (1880 – )

| | 6. William Charles BOYD (1883 – )

| | 7. Emma Louisa Marion BOYD (23 Apr 1886 – ) & Adam WHITCOMBE (23 Dec 1876 – )

| | | 1. Constance Mary Ann WHITCOMBE & William John FEIL (10 Mar 1915 – )

| | 8. Arthur Henry Harold BOYD (26 Oct 1888 – )

| | 9. Reginald James BOYD (25 Feb 1890 – )

| | 10. Leslie George BOYD (1893 – )

| 5. Martha BOYD (1850 – 1851)

| 6. Sarah Jane BOYD (30 Sep 1852 – ) & Jonathan STEVENS (1837 – )

| | 1. Edith Martha STEVENS (1871 – )

| | 2. Eva Maude STEVENS (1872 – )

| | 3. Edward Henry STEVENS (1875 – )

| 7. Frederick BOYD (16 Dec 1855 – 27 Dec 1859)

| 8. Harriet BOYD (21 Jun 1858 – ) & John CUNNINGHAM (1858 – )

| | 1. Albert Frederick CUNNINGHAM (1879 – )

| | 2. Percy CUNNINGHAM (1881 – )

| | 3. Edgar John CUNNINGHAM (1883 – )

| | 4. Mabel Alice CUNNINGHAM (1885 – )

| | 5. Alfred Hedley CUNNINGHAM (1887 – )

| | 6. Ruby Nereda CUNNINGHAM (1891 – )

| | 7. Reginald James CUNNINGHAM (1895 – )

| | 8. Arthur Leonard CUNNINGHAM (1897 – )

| | 9. Dorth Evelene Annie CUNNINGHAM (1899 – )

| 9. Martha (Caroline) BOYD (1861 – ) & John GRIFFITHS (9 Aug 1859 – )

| 10. Unknown BOYD (1861 – )

| 11. Frederick BOYD (7 May 1861 – ) & Cherry GUTTRIDGE (1862 – )

| | 1. John Henry BOYD (1898 – )

Family of Francis and Isabella Colgrave

1. Francis COLGROVE (4 Mar 1806 – 25 Oct 1890) & Isabella WATKINS (Approx 1823 – 3 Nov 1890)

 1. Isabella COLGRAVE

 2. Francis COLGRAVE (11 Nov 1843 – 26 Jun 1920) & Susan BOYD (29 May 1844 – 27 Feb 1900)

     1. Francis John COLGRAVE (25 Feb 1866 – 31 Dec 1942) & Laura Maud WYNWOOD (21 Mar 1870 – 8 Apr 1969)

     2. Samuel COLGRAVE (13 Aug 1867 – 17 Feb 1955) & Jeanne (Jane) DUNCANSON (27 Feb 1875 – 31 Jul 1945)

     3. Frances Isabella COLGRAVE* (10 Feb 1869 – 21 Mar 1928) & House Servant COLGRAVE??

     3. Frances Isabella COLGRAVE* (10 Feb 1869 – 21 Mar 1928) & William Edward JONES (1844 – 28 Oct 1912)

     3. Frances Isabella COLGRAVE* (10 Feb 1869 – 21 Mar 1928) & Cyril Edwin HEAZLEWOOD (8 Apr 1890 – 1954)

     4. William F COLGRAVE (23 Dec 1871 – 13 Nov 1905) & Lillian May BROWN (25 May 1881 – )

     5. Martha Jane COLGRAVE (13 Mar 1874 – 18 Aug 1954) & George DAVEY (31 May 1865 – 2 Nov 1914)

     6. Lillian Ada (Moy) COLGRAVE (27 Jun 1876 – 7 Mar 1957) & Charles DAVEY (19 Feb 1872 – 18 Oct 1914)

     7. Alfred Arthur (John) COLGRAVE (7 Nov 1878 – 2 May 1959) & Ada Mary COWARD (1876 – 16 Aug 1953)

     8. Ernest Charles COLGRAVE (30 Dec 1881 – 16 May 1940) & Alice Maria

     9. Ethel Mary Ann COLGRAVE* (9 Dec 1883 – ) & Mark REDBURN (1865 – 8 Jan 1936)

     9. Ethel Mary Ann COLGRAVE* (9 Dec 1883 – ) & Arthur THOMPSON (1882 – )

     10. Frederick George COLGRAVE (28 Aug 1886 – 3 Feb 1959) & Amy Louisa RIGBY (About 1893 – 4 Oct 1985)

 3. Samuel COLGRAVE (23 Apr 1847 – 19 Dec 1916) & Mary Jane CRAWLEY (23 Apr 1845 – 20 Oct 1932)

     1. Samuel Henry COLGRAVE (15 Jun 1870 – 13 Jul 1940) & Susan MERRITT

     2. James COLGRAVE (7 Jul 1872 – 23 Oct 1937)

     3. Mary Jane COLGRAVE (26 May 1875 – Aug 1946) & Thomas MERRITT

     4. Isabella COLGRAVE (29 Jan 1879 – Aug 1957) & Vernon Samuel THOMAS

     5. Andrew (Daniel) COLGRAVE (15 Nov 1881 – 20 Feb 1962) & Elizabeth BUTLER (About 1883 – 19 Aug 1955)

     6. Albert Tasman COLGRAVE (22 Jun 1884 – 25 Nov 1965) & Annie Irene MOUNTAIN

     7. Clara Louisa COLGRAVE (7 Dec 1886 – ) & Charles E BUTLER

 4. Henry COLGRAVE* (9 Aug 1849 – 4 Mar 1904) & Mary Ann DUFF (About 1858 – 13 Feb 1884)

 4. Henry COLGRAVE* (9 Aug 1849 – 4 Mar 1904) & Mary Elizabeth BUTLER (1858 – 3 Sep 1913)

     1. Robert Ronald COLGRAVE (1 Dec 1888 – 27 Jan 1947) & Florence Mary BUTTON ( – 23 Jun 1964)

     2. William Henry (Bob) COLGRAVE (13 Feb 1892 – 8 Aug 1918)

     3. Jessie Leila COLGRAVE (16 Nov 1894 – ) & John Whymond AVERY (21 Oct 1892 – )

 5. William COLGRAVE (2 Jan 1852 – 4 Apr 1932) & Sarah Ann OWEN (8 Mar 1858 – 11 Aug 1935)

     1. Robert COLGRAVE (12 Oct 1877 – 14 Sep 1935) & Eva Theresa Ethel TRAVERS (About 1880 – 13 Feb 1975)

     2. Fanny COLGRAVE (19 Sep 1879 – ) & Jack ARTIS

     3. Rosie COLGRAVE (22 Dec 1881 – 28 Jun 1974)

     4. Ada COLGRAVE (9 Jun 1884 – 28 Feb 1960) & John Edward RICHARDSON

     5. William COLGRAVE (27 Sep 1886 – 5 Apr 1973) & Minnie Idonea TRAVERS

     6. Walter COLGRAVE (21 Nov 1888 – 21 Jul 1955) & Naomi Ava WALTERS (2 Oct 1902 – 13 Oct 1982)

     7. Charlotte May COLGRAVE (21 Apr 1891 – ) & Arthur TURNER

     8. Ruby Jane COLGRAVE (22 Jun 1893 – 11 Oct 1942)

     9. Coral Blanche Maud COLGRAVE (14 Aug 1895 – ) & Alby RICHARDSON

     10. Katie Amelia Maria COLGRAVE (18 Mar 1898 – ) & Les JARMAN

     11. Arthur Ernest COLGRAVE (About 1901 – 19 Dec 1926)

     12. George COLGRAVE (About 1901 – 15 Dec 1965) & Selma May McDOUGALL (About 1907 – 20 Sep 1956)

     13. Gordon Jack COLGRAVE* & Florence Jean HOYLE

     13. Gordon Jack COLGRAVE* & Ivy Lavinia WELLS (NEE THALLEN)

 6. Robert Arthur COLGRAVE* (17 Jan 1857 – 14 Nov 1904) & Mary DACIE

   1. Willie COLGRAVE (2 Oct 1882 – )

 6. Robert Arthur COLGRAVE* (17 Jan 1857 – 14 Nov 1904) & Sarah Jessie FARRANT

 7. Joshua COLGRAVE* (13 Apr 1859 – 13 Dec 1923) & Ellen MAHONEY (About 1848 – 8 Oct 1910)

     1. Louisa May COLGRAVE (13 Oct 1881 – )

     2. Joshua COLGRAVE (9 Jun 1883 – 6 Mar 1955) & Henrietta Louisa JETSON (11 Nov 1885 – 5 Apr 1954)

     3. Emma Jane COLGRAVE (14 Jul 1885 – )

     4. Ernest William COLGRAVE (29 Dec 1887 – Jul 1903)

     5. Daniel COLGRAVE (29 Oct 1890 – )

 7. Joshua COLGRAVE* (13 Apr 1859 – 13 Dec 1923) & Bertha Alice GARRATT (20 Aug 1886 – )

     1. Freda COLGRAVE & Tas RANGER

     2. Len COLGRAVE

     3. Raymond Cyril COLGRAVE & Winifred ?

     4. Edith Merle COLGRAVE (19 Apr 1913 – 5 Jun 1985) & John Herbert JETSON (19 Aug 1907 – 12 Aug 1979)

     5. Joyce Alberta COLGRAVE (9 Jun 1916 – ) & Keith Reginald (Dick) RATTRAY

 8. Louisa COLGRAVE (11 Jun 1863 – ) & Frederick LEWIS (1859 – )

     1. James Frederick LEWIS (20 Nov 1894 – ) & Laura FERGUSON

     2. Percy Edwin LEWIS (2 Aug 1898 – )

     3. Karl LEWIS & Freda?

     4. Peter LEWIS

 9. Arthur COLGRAVE (11 Jul 1866 – 29 Oct 1882)

Colgraves near Evandale

Francis Colgreave appears in the 1858 Assessment Roll for Morven as the owner of a house at Evandale.  He is also listed in the 1867 Directory of Tasmania as a farmer at Evandale.  From 1871 until 1890 Francis Colgrave Senior is listed as the owner of 12 acres and house at Evandale.

In 1881, Francis Colgrave Junior owned 90 acres at Blessington.  In 1891 Francis senior disappears from the rolls due to his death and the names of Samuel, William and Henry Colgrave appear together with Francis Junior.

The 1899-1900 polling list for Evandale also has the names of:

  • Francis J. Colgrave – owner of land at Blessington
  • Samuel Colgrave of Evandale – owns land at Blessington
  • Henry of Evandale – owns a house in Evandale
  • Francis Junior of Blessington – owns land at Kings Meadows
  • James of Evandale was an employee of C. Harvey.

Francis Colgrave’s death was noticed in the Examiner 27 October 1890 – he died on the 25 at his residence, Evandale aged 85.  His widow Isabella died on 3 November 1890 aged 67 Examiner 4 November 1890.