DNA update

A couple of months ago, Ancestry updated their DNA ethnicity results so I thought I might compare from my previous results.

Sue’s results

Sue in 2017
Sue in 2018

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mum’s results

Mum in 2017
Mum in 2018

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dad’s results

Dad in 2017
Dad in 2018

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Philip (brother) only has results for 2018

Philip in 2018

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

As you can see, my family are virtually totally Western European but especially from Great Britain.  The paper trail I have for mum matches her DNA trail, but dad’s paper trail is changing every day due to the DNA  results.

Originally I had no Irish in dad’s paper trail but I have now found three possible lines back to that country.

Readers: When your results were updated, did you notice much of a change?

 

Will, will or will

For this post, week 9 in #52ancestors, I had to decide:

  • Will I research a relative named Will or William?
  • Will I look at a will from one of my relatives?
  • Or will I research a relative who was willing to do more than most?

My decision was to check out the wills of some of my relatives. We are very lucky here in Tasmania that the wills of many people are found online at the LINC Tasmanian names index.

What did I learn from these wills?

My grandmother Hannah ENGLAND had bequeathed 25 pound to each of her grandchildren when they attained the age of 16.

My grandfather Henry Lewis ENGLAND bequeathed his piano to me. I remember as a child learning and practicing those scales and even now, after many years of not using the piano, I can still play most of Fur Elise from memory.

It looks like my great great grandparents John and Annie DAVEY did not leave wills so the Supreme Court appointed some of their children to make an inventory and then to sell the goods and chattels and hand the money to the court to pay costs. I am not very good at reading all that legalese though so it might mean something else entirely.

My great great grandfather Francis COLGRAVE left everything to his two youngest sons, presumably as the older sons already had their own properties and the older sisters were all married with their own families.

I can’t find any more wills of my direct relatives but one of my indirect relatives (sister of my great great grandmother Caroline Chandler nee Bryant) named Esther Julia WINTER left many instructions on who was to receive what in her will.

Readers: What is the most interesting will you have read in your family or from collateral kin?

 

 

Heirlooms

Week 8 in the #52ancestors challenge is looking at heirlooms. I didn’t really think I had anything handed down to me from my grandparents but after chatting to my mum who has been in hospital and rehab over the last three months, I found out about these pieces of carnival glass that were from her parents. I actually thought a couple of pieces were from my father’s mother but maybe I was wrong about that.

I can’t find any makers marks on them but they all seem to be marigold colour.  The vases look like they are swung – started as a tumbler then stretched or swung while still hot. I found a website about carnival glass but as many manufacturers used the same patterns and colours it can be hard to distinguish who made what, especially if no makers marks.

The large basket or bowl in the second image has ball feet on it, but I have noticed some large cracks through the base probably when it has been put down on a table. This is extremely heavy which might have also caused cracks when put on a table.

One of the vases is a lot heavier than the other and both have different patterns.

Northwood glass usually has a makers mark, but Fenton glass only from the 1970s. These are probably the two companies my glass came from as far as I can work out.

Readers: Do any of you know how to easily check carnival glass to work out who made it, what pattern it is and when was it made?

 

 

Valentine

This week for #52ancestors, I decided to check my database to find someone born in the 1800s on Valentine’s Day 14 February. I could only find one person born on Valentine’s Day but that was in 1981 which is too recent for me to write about and research.

But I did find William Demingo SMITH born 16 February 1883 and only surviving till 16 September 1885.

William was the fourth child born to Captain William SMITH and Sarah Ann TEDMAN. He had an older brother Thomas Alexander (Albert) Smith born in 1880. These two young chaps did not survive infancy. William and Sarah had 10 children in total and 7 surviving till adulthood.

At this time, Captain William Smith was master of the whaling ship Marie Laure, based in Hobart and often calling in to Recherche Bay where his family lived near Cockle Creek. This is one of the most southern towns in Tasmania and in the 1870s and 1880s would have been a wild area to live in. There had been a convict station nearby at Southport and the main occupations were sawyers and whalers.

In September 1885, the two young brothers went down suddenly with diarrhoea. Their deaths on the 15th and 16th September were registered by Henry John Daldy, the coroner at Franklin on 20 September. But an interested person naming himself Recherche, wrote to the local Hobart paper The Mercury and had a piece printed on 29 September 1885.

 

 

 

 

 

Favourite name

I don’t really have any favourite names among my ancestors because many of them are William, John, George, Hannah, Martha etc.

But I have always wanted to know where my great grandmother got her name from.

Julia Charlotte Chandler

Julia was born in Tasmania on 1 October 1860 to parents William CHANDLER and Caroline BRYANT. She married Henry Lewis ENGLAND

Naming patterns were often used so who were the mothers of William and Caroline?

I have no idea of William’s mother – need to do more research on this. But Caroline’s mother is Charlotte BRYANT. OK we have part of Julia’s name accounted for. Now to find out who the Julia comes from.

Possibly someone important in Caroline’s life – perhaps a sister or friend from back in England?

Looking on the marriage certificate for Caroline, the witnesses are RG Winter and Emma Mains? Who could these people be? They weren’t mentioned on the other marriages so would have to be friends rather than church clerks etc.

I decided to check any Tasmanian wills for an RG Winter or any Winter with the name Julia included to see if there was any reference to my Caroline.

There it was.

Robert George Winter had a wife Esther Julia Winter and some of the witnesses to his will had the surname Chandler. I could be getting close. Could Esther Julia be Caroline’s sister?

Esther Julia WINTER was bequeathing her worldly goods and chattels to her sister Caroline Chandler. She also mentioned the names of nieces who she gave particular workboxes and vases to – these were all relatives of my Julia Charlotte England nee Chandler.

I now know where her name came from:

Julia after Caroline’s sister who also arrived in Tasmania as a married woman in the 1850s

Charlotte after Caroline’s mother