Talking to Aunty Marg

As part of the Oral History course, I interviewed my Aunty Margaret, my mother’s sister. I recorded on my iPad then edited using the Wavepad program on my PC.

We had to submit a three minute recording with a transcript – I received a score of 88% but was mentioned I should use more ellipses … when the voice trails off in the recording.

Here is the actual edited recording and the transcript.

 

Interviewee: Margaret Phillips [MP]

Interviewer: Suzanne Wyatt [SW]

Date: November 16, 2016

Place: Her lounge room in West Moonah.

As Margaret is nearly blind, I read the information and consent forms to her. The interview is solely for family history purposes.

This starts at 16 seconds in on the audio file.

SW: Marg, do you give verbal consent for me to interview and record your responses?

MP: I do.

SW: What’s your full name, your date

MP: Marg

SW: of birth and your present address?

MP: Margaret Grace Phillips or do would you want England?

SW: No, that’s OK.

MP: 7/4/28 I was born. Unit 3/17 Sawyer Avenue, West Moonah.

Three minute interview starts here  00:31

SW: So how would you best describe your father? I’ve got some photos here in front of you. One here, they’re in a running race, and

(Both speaking at the same time)

MP: that was the city

SW: there are some birds

MP: That was the City Council, they the City Council had a picnic day once a year and this was down at Long Beach, just round about where the uh roundabout is [pause] I think the roundabout down there now isn’t there?  Well that’s where it was, round about that area.

SW: So how did he go in the races? Was he a good runner?

MP: Yes, he was.

(Both speaking at the same time)

SW: and

MP: He won that if I’m not mistaken.

SW: Oh right.

MP: He got, he got some little thing.

SW: Oh it might be mentioned in the newspaper. I’ll be able to look it up.

MP: He uh always wore his watch with the chain on it, the fob watch. He always had that on where every where you wore a collar and tie.

SW: And some of these these other photos, he’s there with some birds. Is that in your back yard at

MP: Yes we had pigeon, pigeon loft and dad’d get the pigeons out and I would run up to Fitzroy Gardens and stand in a special place. I’ve let the pigeons go and dad would see who got home first, me or the pigeons. That was re about a weekly [pause] weekly um thing that he did. Yep.

SW: Oh right. And there’s another one there of. It looks like you and my mum and your dad in a rowboat.

MP: This one?

SW: Mmm.

MP: That

SW: Yeah.

MP: That’s dad and yeah Phyllis is in the middle and me on the end. That’ll be, I reckon, about the first time I went out in it.

SW: So did your dad go out rowing often?

MP: Oh, every weekend he went down to Sandy Bay baths to fish. And he had a little fish, he had a little uh what do you call’em now? Over the boat’s um  [long pause] He was known.  When you went to Long Beach on the trams, us kids would all go upstairs on the double decker tram and when we got to Wrest Point, “There’s Uncle Harry out there!” Everybody knew dad.

SW: Right

MP: And um he used to tell us.  I was only telling someone the other day. He always took a little bottle of water. He couldn’t swim and he never had a life jacket or anything in the boat. He took a little bottle of water with him every time and when the fish started to bite, he’d go round like that [fading voice as she turns to the side] to some …[inaudible] to come back,  he’d just put,  “I’ve just put the oil of catchem in the water,” he said. And that’s how they caught their fish. But dad with his oil of catchem. They never ever woke up to it. When we went on the trams down they’d say, “Uncle Harry, Uncle Harry!” and everybody would wave. He was well known in Sandy Bay.

……………………………………….

Readers: Have you ever formally interviewed a relative? What was the most difficult part of the interview?

Dating photographs

A photograph is just one small moment in the life of the family or object. Five minutes before or after and the image would be very different.

So the quiz assessment for this course involves dating photographs. Some research on this topic should help me. Lots of sources are given in the course but here is my summary.

Types of early photographs

  • Daguerrotype (began in 1839 until about 1860) can be seen as either a positive or negative image depending upon the angle viewed. Do not expose to light and often found in velvet lined cases.
  • Calotype (began in 1841 but rare) meant multiple copies could be made onto paper but images were not as clear as a daguerrotype.
  • Ambrotype (began in 1851 until about 1880) is a negative put on a dark background to make a positive looking image. Backing material often paper, lacquer or velvet. With glass cheaper than silver coated copper, ambrotypes quickly took over from daguerrotypes.

Anyone having a photo taken using any of the above formats must have had money as they were fairly expensive.

  • Tintype (began in 1853 until about 1930) printed on lacquered iron rather than glass. Generally done in a studio, now becoming less expensive so more people could have their own photos. Often these were like thumbnails we have nowadays in photography.

If you are interested in photography in Australia, here is a link to a timeline from the Art Gallery of NSW. There are also some picture collections from the National Library of Australia including those by Peter Dombrovskis in Tasmania.

I haven’t seen any of these types of photos in my family photo box – they all seem to be from the 1900’s onwards but I am still going to have to look at fashions to date more accurately.

Here are the steps recommended for studying a photo and learning to date it:

  1. Inscriptions on the photograph
  2. Identify the photographic process used
  3. Identify the photographer or studio
  4. Date by costume
  5. Date by studio background & props
  6. Date using other photograph contents (ie. car number plates, cinema signs etc.)

Going to check this out using another photo in my family collection.

20160708-135050-1cmbrk1.jpg

 

Inscriptions on the photo

To Lizzie and Jim with compliments from Harry and Hanna June 16th 1923

Photographic process

Looks like albumen of some sort

Photographer or studio

Bottom right of page is Crawfords Studios, 64 Murray Street, Hobart

Date by costume

Looks like wedding portrait

Date by studio background or props – nil

Other photographic content – nil

Here are some websites to help when looking at fashions.

Photo tree walks you through a case study as well as giving you a gallery of photos to study.

Roger Vaughan personal collection including changing fashions from 1850-1950.

Victoria and Albert Museum goes through decade by decade with changing male and female fashions.

The Australian Dress Register looks more at Aussie styles of clothing. They also include a timeline sorted by type of clothing.

The Australian War Memorial has military uniforms worn by servicemen and women in Australia.

Readers: What fashion traits makes this photo one taken in the early 1920’s?

 

 

 

Letter N challenge

Today is ANZAC Day here in Australia and New Zealand so I thought I could combine three things in one post.

Wreaths in Hall of ValourThe letter N is for

New Course

I have enrolled as a student in a new course HAA007 (part of the Diploma of Family History) at the University of Tasmania titled “Convict Ancestors” run by Hamish Maxwell-Stewart and his team. I have previously been involved with “Founders and Survivors” also organized with Hamish and a different team. They were looking at descendants of convicts and how their improvements in health evolved over time eg height , weight of sons, grandsons  etc

So this leads to the second part of this post which is looking at the descendants of my convicts who may have served in WWI. I will need to carefully look at my database and check them out – so far I know of three in the COLGRAVE side of the tree.

Finally to the third thing in this post is a link I found on another facebook group which is about a special blog post for Military Monday and relating to ANZAC Day. For those searching for information on their soldiers in WWI, check out the great links in that blog post.

So now let’s start the true part of the post.  My convicts and their descendants who served in WWI:

Francis COL(E)GRAVE:

Great grandson – Private Roy Graham COLGRAVE who I have researched carefully and already written a post about his life in WWI. His records are in the National Archives of Australia SERN 5996 – 56 pages

Grandson –  William COLGRAVE – SERN 834 – 66 pages

Grandson –  Walter COLGRAVE – SERN Depot – 20 pages

Great grandson –  Walter William COLGRAVE – SERN T9050 – 15 pages

Great grandson –  Tasman Allan COLGRAVE – SERN 1060 – 33 pages

Great grandson – Angus Colin COLGRAVE – no digitised record yet

William TEDMAN

Grandson – Edward James TEDMAN – SERN 6096 – 37 pages

John ENGLAND

Grandson? – Edward ENGLAND – is this Vivian Edward ENGLAND? – SERN 2177 – 16 pages

I haven’t researched the BOYD side of the tree enough to know the grandsons and great grandsons who might be mentioned in the Discovering ANZACs website.

Readers: Please leave a comment about my post or something beginning with N that relates to your family history or your research.

 letter N

Letter D challenge

1558 Ainscough Origins

Boobelle via Compfight

Direct Line or Descendants

When you began your family history research, what did you start with? Did you begin with yourself and go back one generation at a time following your direct line only? Or did you also look at the descendants of those direct lines?

I know when I began I started just with names, dates and places and going back as far as I could – in fact I got back to 1604 with one line in Bedfordshire, England. I made connections with other researchers by using the Rootsweb emailing lists and also contacting others mentioned in the IGI (International Genealogical Index) and the IGRD (International Genealogical Research Directory). I exchanged information through RAOGK (Random Acts of Genealogical Kindness) where I would do some research in Tasmania for a person in another county of England and they would do research for me in their county.

But nowadays technology has really allowed me to do a lot more research with original records online. Less having to visit an actual archives, at least for the basics of BDM records. But it is fantastic to see so many Historical Societies having a presence online. This now allows me to connect with locals in the areas where my ancestors lived. My family history blog has also created connections with family members I knew nothing about.

By researching the descendants I have found out more about their life as a family and the community they lived in. Trove and other newspaper reports have put flesh on the bones of my family rather than just a list of names, dates and places.

Surnames in my direct line include:

  • WYATT – unknown where born
  • ENGLAND – Rotherham, York, ENG
  • SMITH – Recherche Bay, Tasmania AUS but originally Samoan and given surname Smith
  • DAVEY – Devon, ENG – free settler and down to 7 possible people
  • TEDMAN – London, ENG – waterman
  • CHANDLER – London, ENG – gardeners in Tasmania and at Government House in the 1860’s
  • COLGRAVE –  Thurleigh, Bedfordshire, ENG – back to 1604
  • SOMMERS – Portland, Tasmania, AUS
  • JACKSON – Donegal, Ireland
  • DIXON – London, ENG
  • BOYD – Maker, Cornwall, ENG
  • WATKINS – Hull, Yorkshire, ENG
  • HEARN – Edgeware, London, ENG
  • BRYANT – Rotherhithe, London, ENG
  • BULL – London, ENG
  • SWAIN – Maidstone, Kent, ENG

Readers: Please leave a comment about my post or something beginning with D that relates to your family history or your research.

letter D

Family History Course

I have just enrolled in an online Family History course run through the University of Tasmania. (Click on image to go to enrolment page)

Our first assessment task is an interview with another family member who might be able to give you more information for your main research project.

So I have to decide who I will interview.

Will it be my Aunt Margaret, my mother’s sister? Both my mum and her sister are alive and often tell me a variety of things about family history especially if there is a photo in front of them. In fact, my aunt has just given me some new photos she found when cleaning out her cupboards. Some I had seen before, others were new especially the one of her father in a running race.

Or will I interview one of my SMITH relatives who I know very little about? My grandmother born a SMITH, didn’t have much to do with her younger siblings so I don’t know much about them and their families or what they have been told about their earlier ancestors like Captain William SMITH from Samoa.

Who do you think I should interview – Aunt Margaret or a SMITH relative?

Family of John and Rebecca England

1. John ENGLAND ( – 10 Feb 1905) & Rebecca JACKSON (About 1833 – 23 Oct 1906)

1. William ENGLAND (16 Oct 1852 – 11 Mar 1854)

2. Henry Lewis ENGLAND (26 Dec 1854 – 29 Aug 1932) & Julia Charlotte CHANDLER (1 Oct 1860 – 3 Mar 1905)

1. Ruby May ENGLAND (5 Jul 1886 – 29 Oct 1967) & Arthur John Sydney STIRLING (1885 – )

2. Henry Lewis ENGLAND (12 Dec 1888 – 12 Mar 1963) & Hannah DAVEY (10 Nov 1899 – 7 Mar 1967)

3. Gladys Emily ENGLAND (4 Aug 1891 – Sep 1977) & Harold AMINDE

4. Lucy Grace ENGLAND (22 Oct 1894 – 7 Oct 1914)

3. Elizabeth ENGLAND (22 Feb 1857 – ) & Joseph BRADLEY (1856 – )

1. Alice Rebecca BRADLEY (1879 – )

2. Madeline BRADLEY (1880 – )

3. Lily BRADLEY (1882 – )

4. Elizabeth Mary BRADLEY (1884 – )

5. BRADLEY (1885 – 1886)

6. George BRADLEY (27 Oct 1890 – )

7. John BRADLEY (1892 – )

8. Joseph BRADLEY (1896 – )

4. Male ENGLAND (4 Nov 1859 – ) Probably Edward

5. Mary Ann ENGLAND (30 Nov 1861 – )

6. William James ENGLAND (2 Mar 1864 – ) & Sarah SINFIELD (1861 – )

7. Female ENGLAND (28 Jul 1866 – )

8. George Thomas ENGLAND (3 Dec 1868 – )

Pre trial information on John England

On March 19, 1846 a warrant was set out by John Fullerton Esquire (JP) to John Bland (Constable of Rotherham) or to John Timms (deputy) and to the Governor of the Castle of York to convey John England, Samuel Myers, Joseph Barras and Richard Hague to the Castle of York and to deliver them to the Governor with the warrant.

John England , a labourer, on 15 March 1846 did with force and arms upon Maria Kaufman violently and feloniously make an assault and violently and feloniously did ravish and carnally know her. The other four with force and arms were present aiding, abetting and assisting John England.

Witnesses were John Bland, Maria Kaufman, Philippina(Caroline) Kaufman, Emma Harrison and William Hudson.

He was tried on 9 July 1846 at the York Assizes and was transported for life. It was his first conviction and it was rape in companion with Joseph Barras, William Thompson, William Aizlewood and Samuel Myers. John and Samuel arrived on board the same boat. There were 2 girls Caroline and Maria Kaufman.

Whilst awaiting trial, friends of John England did the following.

On June 9, 1846 George Aizlewood, Joseph Hague, Michael and Hannah Bradshaw, being evil disposed persons, unlawfully and wickedly with force and arms did conspire, combine, confederate and agree together to persuade Maria and Philippina Kaufman from attending to give evidence as witnesses.

They did this by paying and defraying the fare and expenses of the journey by railroad from Rotherham to London. Hannah paid 20 shillings for steam boat for parts beyond the seas. On 20 June 1846 she purchased and paid for diverse wearing apparel for Maria and Philippina.

They tried to induce Maria and Philippina severally to suppress the evidence they knew and to withdraw and conceal themselves.

John England

John is an ancestor I feel was sent out to Van Diemens Land for a deserving reason. He didn’t just try to help feed or clothe his family in these trying times in England, but he and his friends decided to carnally assault a young woman – known as rape both then and now. He and two of his friends Joseph BARRAS and Samuel MYERS were given life for their crime even though it was John’s first conviction. They were tried at the York Assizes on 9 July 1846 and embarked on the ship Pestonjee Bomanjee (2) on 25 October 1846.

Whilst I was at the Public Record Office (PRO) in London during a vacation, I looked up the trial records of John and found some of his other friends had tried to help him before his trial date. A summary of what I found is here.

John was an iron moulder, 5 feet 6 and three-quarters, aged 19 with a fair complexion, oval head and visage, sandy hair but no whiskers, medium height forehead, brown eyebrows but hazel eyes and a large nose, mouth and chin. He had many marks on himself: boys/men blowing horn, birds and bush, ship and 2 fishes, bust of woman, sailor with flag etc.

When he arrived in VDL on 17 February 1847, he was sent to Darlington which is on Maria Island. He was based here for two years, then six months with the Public Works Department and finally 12 months at the prisoner barracks. Whilst at Darlington he was insolent and given 10 days solitary confinement, was admonished for being idle and when he was caught fighting on the works he was given 14 days solitary. Remittance could be gained by doing extra work, so John was employed by John Swaine in Collins Street, Hobart, then Crosby and Robinson in Campbell Street and again with John Swaine. On 3 June 1851, he was admonished for being out after hours. He was given his ticket of leave on 8 August 1854, his marriage to Rebecca Jackson was approved on 20 September 1854 and on 16 August in 1855 he resisted a constable and was fined one pound. He was recommended for his conditional pardon on 11 September 1855 and given it on 22 July 1856.

Rebecca Jackson

Rebecca is one of my ‘hard to find out anything about’ convicts. All I know is that her native place was county Donegal in Ireland. She was Presbyterian and could read a little. She was convicted of stealing wearing apparel. It was her first conviction and Sarah STEELE (?) was also on board for the same offence. She was an exemplary convict according to the surgeon’s report.

Her description says she was 5 feet 1 inch tall, age 17, with a fair complexion, large head and mouth, small nose and chin, brown hair and eyebrows, blue eyes, an oval visage and high forehead.

She was tried at Donegal on 1 January 1847 and departed Dublin on the ship Waverley 3 on 19 July 1847. On arrival in Van Diemens Land on 25 October 1847, she was assigned to the ship Anson which was moored in the Derwent River. After 6 months she was given 3rd class status, her ticket of leave on 2 July 1850 and her certificate of freedom 3 January 1854. Marriage to John ENGLAND was approved on 20 September 1854 and they did the deed on 16 October 1854 at St Georges Church, Battery Point, Hobart.

STOP PRESS      UPDATE           STOP PRESS       UPDATE

Since my recent trip to Ireland I have more news about Rebecca. She is no longer labelled ‘hard to find out anything about’.